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CPE 4.28: Novogradac QAP Fundamentals and Hot Topics Webinar
May 14, 2019
Podcast

Disaster Relief Bill (Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2019, H.R. 2157); Opportunity Zones Reporting Legislation (S. 1344); Clean Energy for America Act (S. 1288); NCSHA Letter on LIHTC Compliance Monitoring Regulations; HUD Proposal on Housing Assistance Eligibility; Calculating the HUD Over-Income Limit; Freddie Mac Opportunity Zones Report; FHA Incentives for Multifamily Affordable Housing Property in Opportunity Zones; California Budget Request; Maine LIHTC Bill (L.D. 1645); Hawaii HTC Bill (S.B. 1394)

March 11, 2016
Blog Article
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2014 Renewable Energy Project that Best Demonstrates Financial Innovation

March 3, 2017
Blog Article
June 1, 2011
Periodical News Brief

The Oregon Department of Energy (ODOE) implemented temporary rules that classify the Section 1603 grant in lieu of renewable energy tax credits as a federal grant to be deducted from Oregon business energy tax credit (BETC) project costs.

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Agenda for the 2016 Novogradac Financing Renewable Energy Tax Credit fall conference.

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Agenda for Novogradac 2017 Financing Renewable Energy Tax Credits Fall Conference.

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Conference Subpage
May 2, 2017
Periodical News Brief

On March 14, the Haas Institute released the study, “Opportunity, Race, and Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Projects: An Analysis of LIHTC Developments in the San Francisco Bay Area,” which comprehensively analyzes the administration of the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program. The Haas Institute examined LIHTC properties in the San Francisco Bay Area, and results showed that developments financed by the LIHTC in the Bay Area were relatively well distributed across boundaries of opportunity. According to the report, nearly two-thirds of LIHTC developments (64.9 percent) in the nine-county area were sited in moderate, low-, and very-low-opportunity neighborhoods during the years for which data was available (1987-2014). In addition, the Haas Institute stated that 9 percent credits were more frequently used to create housing in high-opportunity neighborhoods than 4 percent credits. However, more than 45 percent of large family developments were sited in low- and very-low-opportunity areas, with these types of properties disproportionately placed in low-opportunity areas where resources for families with children are inadequate to support healthy development and upward mobility. In addition, results indicate that 9 percent LIHTC developments are sited in neighborhoods that are not racially integrated; on a ratio of 3.78-to-1 basis, and 9 percent developments were sited in neighborhoods where 50 percent or more of the population were people of color. The report is available at www.taxcredithousing.com.